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HORSE OWNERS EMERGENCY EVACUATION TIPS



PLAN AHEAD

    1. TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS OR VIDEOS OF YOUR HORSES AND PREPARE WRITTEN DESCRIPTIONS OF EACH OF THEM.

    • Put these in a safe place away from where the horses are kept, such as a bank safe deposit box, so you can provide identification information to animal control personnel should your horses become lost or separated from you.

    2. PLACE AN IDENTIFICATION TAG ON THE HORSE ITSELF WITH THE HORSE'S NAME, YOUR NAME, ADDRESS AND PHONE NUMBER.

    • Tattoos, brands, etched hooves or microchips are best. Tags on halters, neck bands, or duct tape with permanent writing will also work. Keep identification information with you to verify ownership. Also advised are identification tags and pet carriers for small pets. Include an emergency name and phone number out of the area in case you cannot be reached.

    3. KEEP 'TRAILERS AND TRUCKS WELL-MAINTAINED, WITH FULL GAS TANKS, AND READY TO MOVE AT ALL TIMES.

    • Make sure your horses are well schooled in trailer loading. If you don't have your own vehicle, make arrangements with local companies, neighbors or friends before disaster strikes.

    4. A HALTER AND LEAD ROPE SHOULD BE READILY AVAILABLE FOR EACH HORSE.

    • Non-nylon (such as cotton) is preferred, as nylon will melt in a fire.

    5. WRITE DOWN CONTACT INFORMATION FOR YOUR VETERINARIAN.

    • Keep medical histories, and be sure to record any special needs a horse may have, such as dietary requirements, allergies, medication and dosage. Vaccinations should be kept current.

    5. KEEP THE AREA AROUND YOUR BARNS AND CORRALS WELL CLEARED OF BRUSH AND OTHER COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS - At least 30 feet.

    6. TAKE TIME TO MAKE A PLAN FOR WHAT TO DO IN THE EVENT OF A FIRE.

    • Decide where to take your horses if evacuation is necessary. Contact fairgrounds, equestrian centers and private stables about their policies and ability to take horses temporarily in an emergency. Have several sites in mind, depending on which direction you need to go.

    7. FAMILIARIZE YOURSELF WITH SEVERAL EVACUATION ROUTES TO YOUR DESTINATION.

    • Plan for alternate exit routes on foot with your horses if roads are blocked.

    8. DISCUSS YOUR PLAN WITH EVERYONE AT YOUR FACILITY SO THEY ALL KNOW WHAT TO DO.

    • There won't be time to figure it out in an emergency.
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EVACUATION

    1. EVACUATE YOUR HORSES EARLY, IF POSSIBLE, TO ENSURE THEIR SAFETY AND EASE YOUR STRESS.

    • Call your destination to make sure the site is still available, and to alert them you are evacuating. Take the medical records and other items you have set aside to take with you in an emergency.

    2. DOOR OR GATE AFTER YOU EXIT.

    • Loose horses have been known to run back into their stalls. In a fast-moving fire where many horses are involved, they may need to be led out and turned loose to save as many as possible.

    3. IF A HORSE IS BURNED IN A FIRE, SEEK VETERINARY MEDICAL ATTENTION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

    • A burn is always a serious condition, allowing the possibility of bacterial invasion of the body. Also, damage to the respiratory tract due to smoke inhalation is frequently a cause of death in severe burn patients. DO NOT treat burns with any topical preparations before the vet arrives, as the wrong choice could do more harm than good.

    4. USE CAUTION WHEN APPROACHING AND HANDLING STRANGE OR FRIGHTENED HORSES.

    • Work in pairs, if possible.
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POST-EVACUATION

    1. CALL ANlMAL CONTROL,

    • Let them know you have evacuated.

    2. IF YOUR HORSE IS LOST,

    • Contact California Veterinary Medical Association and local Animal Control immediately. Other contacts include veterinarians, humane societies, stables and farms in the area, and listen to the Emergency Broadcast System for groups that may be accepting lost animals. Be prepared to show identification and proof of ownership when claiming your horse.

    3. MOST IMPORTANT - EVERY HORSE OWNER IS ULTIMATELY RESPONSIBLE FOR HIS/HER OWN HORSES - BE SURE YOU HAVE AN EFFECTIVE PLAN!

    • Always be alert to what is happening, especially during fire season. plan to keep several days worth of food and water on hand at all times so you will not be caught unprepared.
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Post Evacuation Evacuation Plan Ahead